teaching

  • Thinking about teaching 4: History of Women/History of Sexuality

    In addition to my U.S. survey classes, which I examined in earlier posts, I also taught 200-level courses on the history of women in the U.S. in the fall and history of sexuality in the U.S in the spring of this past academic year. I’ll be teaching history of women again this fall, which is […]

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  • Teaching religious n00bs and skeptics

    I read Jolyon Baraka Thomas’ piece “Teaching True Believers” last week and I’ve been thinking about it ever since. In it, Thomas discusses the difficulty of getting students to think critically about religious belief. Here’s a taste, but I encourage you to read the entire piece. We do not tell our students what to believe, nor […]

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  • Thoughts on Continuity

    I wonder if progressive historians tend to be more favorable to “change over time” than “continuity” when studying the past. Source: Do Historians Privilege “Change Over Time” Over “Continuity?” | the way of improvement leads home John Fea’s great piece and the comments on it have crystallized something for me that I think is important […]

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  • Thinking about teaching 3

    Having outlined my basic structure for my U.S. survey courses, let’s get down to it. What do I like and not like about how my courses work? (This is long, maybe take a break for a cup of tea in the middle.) The lessons: I love that the “flipped” structure allows us the time to […]

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  • Think-aloud guidelines

    In case they’re of any interest to those who read my earlier post on think-alouds, these are the two sets of guidelines I give students. 130 how to think aloud Spring 2016 130 Reading like a historian Spring 2016

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  • Thinking about teaching 2

    In Sam Wineburg’s Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts, he compares the way high school students and “historians” (presumably those with doctorates working in the academy) read historical texts. To do this, he has the two groups of readers “think aloud” as they read, telling the observer what is going through their head, what questions and […]

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  • Thinking about teaching 1

    As I mentioned earlier, I want to use this space to think about teaching, from course structure to reading selection to classroom management and approaches. This first post, and several subsequent posts, will be to establish the current structures of my courses, what I like, and what I don’t like. My classes are (if my […]

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  • It’s time to acknowledge the genocide of California’s Indians – LA Times

    Between 1846 and 1870, California’s Indian population plunged from perhaps 150,000 to 30,000. Diseases, dislocation and starvation caused many of these deaths, but the near-annihilation of the California Indians was not the unavoidable result of two civilizations coming into contact for the first time. It was genocide, sanctioned and facilitated by California officials. Source: It’s time […]

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  • It’s not even past

    A useful reminder that things we study that can seem so antiquated to young students are within the living memory and experience of lots of people. 55 yrs ago today on the Freedom Rides, we were beaten by a mob in Montgomery. A crate was smashed over my head. pic.twitter.com/Abk5iF8U8Z — John Lewis (@repjohnlewis) May 20, 2016

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  • Morley Safer reports from Vietnam in 1965

    Saw this floating around Twitter after the news of Morley Safer’s death, and I’m considering working portions of it into our discussion of Vietnam (and longer-term discussion of the media) in US II this fall. Check out the interview with Maj. Charles Beckwith at 6:38.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NDJwgp0vCeg

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